The Broken Wing: The Crane Quilt

A miniature silk quilt completed in 2018, for Andy Brunhammer & Jim Smith’s Hope Project.*

Patchworkofmylife crane mini quilt
Pieced origami quilt block

The beautiful cream colored silks were a gift from Tina Katwal of The Square Inch, Chennai!

Patchworkofmylife crane mini quilt
10 cranes were pieced in pure fine silk on a textured raw silk background; the smallest 1” and largest 3” big
Patchworkofmylife crane mini quilt
The hand quilted rows are 1/8” to 1/10” apart.
The cranes are lightly trapuntoed and outlined in silver thread.
Patchworkofmylife crane mini quilt
Weeds made with unraveled silver thread embroidered in to add interest to the background.
Patchworkofmylife crane mini quilt
The smallest, leading crane has a broken wing…giving the quilt its title.
Patchworkofmylife crane mini quilt
The finished cranes mini quilt ‘The Broken Wing’

Ready to hang…

*The Story of the Hope Project:

I quote Jim:

A couple of years ago a Facebook connection was making Cranes quilt blocks, and I learned that he was making 1,000 Crane Blocks. I asked him about his idea and why did he feel inclined to make the 1,000 Cranes. 
I had read about the young  Japanese Hiroshima victim, Sadako Sasaki  and her challenge to herself about attempting to fold 1,000 Origami Cranes. The tale spins in different directions whether she survived her goal before she passed away from complications attributed to the nuclear explosion and sickness

I then asked Andy if he was willing to, between quilt projects, to possibly create Crane paper-pieced blocks from leftover scraps. I told him that I had an idea of designing and creating, once we reached 1,000 Cranes, a possible series of Cranes Quilt panels that we could donate to a children’s hospital. 

Andy agreed. I created a pattern. At the time we were asked by a friend of ours, Melissa Helms, to design a quilt for the 25th Anniversary for a children’s cancer society...

And so the Hope Project was born, which I joined in.

The Hope Project was premiered at the UUC Octagon Art Center in Clearwater, Florida in January this year. Five of the 40 odd quilts made by Jim and Andy were also recently shown at Houston 2019. They eventually hope to donate their collection to a Pediatric Cancer facility/ organization/ hospital…

The Baroda Bayadére: A Painted and Quilted Miniature Portrait

The Baroda Bayadere
The Legend

I love to browse through antiquarian books and read stories of the India that was….

One day, I was flipping through the e-edition of a profusely illustrated book written by Louis Rousselet, a Frenchman who travelled from 1864 to 1870 to the numerous kingdoms that dotted Central India and was treated as an honoured guest by the rulers. In June 1865, he reached Baroda in West India and was received with great pomp by  the Gaicowar Maharaj ( as the king liked to be called). I was reading his account of the grandeur of the palace, when I came to a sudden stop on page 99, captivated by the young dancing girl who stared back at me.

She and her companions had intrigued Rousselet too. He writes

Several young and pretty dancing girls, covered with trinkets and attired in thin chemises, mingle with the strange and motley crowd that fills the palace. These are bayadéres, or dancing girls; who have perfect liberty to go wherever they please. They enter the king’s apartments, seat themselves on the floor, and converse boldly with persons of the very highest rank. This singular privilige accorded to the bayadéres is of very great service: their presence makes up, in some slight degree, for the absence of the ladies shut up in the zenana.

At evening the strains of lute resound on every side; the chambers and terraces are illuminated, and brilliant circles are formed around these charming nautchinis, who give quite a vestal aspect to the palace songs and dances… (while) the king and his ministers …discuss State affairs...

The bayadére has been beautifully captured in this print made from a wood engraving.  Not in a a thin chemise, but covered from top to bottom in voluminous folds.  As I looked at her, it was there, the proud and confident bearing that the Frenchman refers too. But was there something more? A hint of pain…and a resigned acceptance of her fate? Was there amusement at the ways of the world in the slight curve to her pouting lips? This young girl, about 15 or 16 old, was after all, no more than a concubine. Just a little better than a slave in the palace. Available to whoever fancied her. Was she really free to move out of the palace? What went on in her mind as she posed for the white man who sketched her? Her eyes spoke to me and called out to me to bring her alive!

The Preparation

About the copyright: I spent several days trying to establish who owns the copyrights to the image. The book itself has been re-printed several times, including by an Indian publisher some 10 years ago. I wrote to the latter but got no response. Some stock image websites carry the image, and one site has even sold a print  from the original wood engraving. But it is clear from the general information available online that because of its antiquity, the image falls in the public domain.

I enlarged the picture on my laptop, removed the background on MSWord and prepared the vector image on CorelDraw.

The enlarged vector image of the bayadére

While I debated how I wanted to create her (it was certainly not going to be a black and white image), I did two miniature quilts based on prints from the same book! You can see the Pali Darwaza that he visited before he came to Baroda, in a previous post. From Baroda he travelled to the Rajpootana (Rajasthan today) traversing through the dreaded Bheel country, where the wood engraving for this cenotaph, the tchatri of Tintoui, was made.

By this time, I was getting around to the idea of doing a miniature for my bayadere too and I started work on her from the A4 size image I had made.  Finally, I would combine my two loves, painting portraits and quilting!

The Process

I trace the outline of the girl on tracing paper, using an Iron On Transfer Pen acquired on my last visit to the USA. I am not very happy with it, as it is not as fine as I would have liked it to be. But it serves my purpose. I transfer the image twice, once on to the cream coloured background fabric and then just the upper garment–the odhani (stole) on pink damask silk fabric. The face is traced separately on cream coloured quilting fabric–just the eyebrows, pupils and mouth to act as a guide for placement of the features during painting. Then is traced the left hand that peeps from under the sleeve and the foot that ventures out from under the ghaaghra/ lehnga (long skirt).

Baroda Bayadere patchworkofmylife 2019
Tracing the image outlines and main features of the face with an Iron-On Transfer Pen on Tracing paper.
The Bayadere Comes Into Being

I use Inktense pencils and a  000 size brush to  paint the face.

Starting to work on the face with Inktense pencils. It is about 1.25″ long

…and the folds of her odhani.

Baroda Bayadere miniature quilt, Patchworkofmylife 2019
I am happy with the initial painting. Details will come in with the quilting.

I want  a suitable setting for her and browse the net for images in public domain. I settle for this image of a stone screen door in Humayun’s Tomb in Delhi. It will take forward the story of my Bayadere beautifully!

Baroda Bayadere - patcworkofmylife miniature painte/quilted portrait
I am not willing to waste time on painting this elaborate screen, so I scale it to a suitable size and print it on commercially available printer-ready fabric.

 I experiment placing the screen on the background fabric using this stabilizer by Floriani that I had read about and bought. You just iron it onto the back of your applique piece and hand press it to the background! No pins required and nothing messy like glue. It works beautifully well and the finished piece is not stiff. You can easliy peel it off and adjust the placement on the background.

I then iron on the tracing of the full outline of the girl on the background.  Time to start working on the ghaaghra/ lehnga (long skirt). I  rummage through my silk and brocade scraps. I find the perfect pink brocade for the tiny pleated sleeves that peep from under the odhani and decide I like the black brocade for the ghaaghra. I do not have enough of it, but let us see how we will get around that!

I rummage some more and find gold fabric that can work for the petticoats peeping out from under the ghaghra. Working with these fabrics is not easy as they are stiff and I want real folds to mimic those on the original. Moreover, I cannot afford any raw edges, as the fabric frays; so I add misty fuse under the gold fabric to stop the fraying. The ghaaghra is hand-stitched to the background with a hemming stitch. I am lucky to have a part of the selvedge in my scrap and that will work great as a border of the ghaaghra. I also add black tulle to the shadowed areas, but that doesn’t work for me and I end up painting in shadows with black. Making the ghaaghra and petticoat to my satisfaction takes me the better part of a day!  I later work more on it,  but we’ll come to that.

I then trim the odhani from the fabric on which I had painted it, along the outline, and glue it carefully to the background, matching the outline. The face is similarly trimmed to size and glued to the background.

Everything is in place. The neck is not fully trimmed and she is yet to put on her ‘trinkets’ .

Learning: Painting on a separate piece of fabric and then attaching the piece to the background allows one to make mistakes and rectify them. However, it would be better to trim the to-be-appliqued piece about 1/8″ beyond the final outline. Stitch on the outline with the applique in place on the background and then trim it to size. Then the stitching line is exactly where it is meant to be. But do remember where your final stitching line is meant to be!

Once everything is in order, I can go ahead and stitch  it down with invisiible thread.  I paint in the jewellery on her neck and ears. This is where I make a mistake, which I realised  only after finishing the quilt… I forgot to trim the neck and my Bayadere has a fat neck, which I plan to recify now. I do remember not to stitch down the ghaaghra, for I have plans for it.The whole picture looks a bit flat as I finish it. I add a double layer of polybatting and a sheet of foundation paper by George Siciliani to stabilize the piece under the girl and the odhani, and carefully quilt in the folds of the odhani and outline the jewellery to give it depth.  The foundation paper tears away and my girl looks lovely after the trapunto! I now ease in more batting between the folds of the ghaaghra and background fabric using a huge needle, to shape her leg under the garment.

Face and odhani folds after the trapunto

I have a brilliant idea for the background. I have found the perfect fabric for the backing; the print is similar to the pattern on the screen behind the girl. I use fusible fleece gifted by my friend Jaya Parker and prepare the sandwich. I plan to quilt it from the back, following the printed pattern!

But before I start doing that, I have to do something  to make the back more interesting. I attach a piece of the background fabric on the back just behind the screen. I now quilt it, so that I have a screen at the back too.  I   consider painting in the stone trellis on the back, but am wise enough to leave it for the end. You will soon find out why.

I then quilt the rest of the background from the back.

Tha back of the quilt
The backing fabric is a perfect match to the stone screen
The screen is quilted rom the front and background from the back.

I am enjoying the free-motion quilting …and zigzag quilt the shadows around her, intensified with Inktense colours.

I quilt the line under her brows and the line of her mouth and chin. The trinkets, of course!

I even dare to quilt the tiny face. I then have fun with a a wooden toothpick and sculpt the contours of her trapuntoed face!

Finally, the shadows behind the girl are quilted and the shadows in her ghaaghra are quilted in too. She is done, except for the floor! I consider adding a shadow of the screen door and play around with photopaint to get an image I can work with.

Playing with the screen door image to get a shadow.

But I decide it is too much work! A quilter friend, Sobana, shows me images of receding tiles in a quilt and asks how it is done. I decide to experiment.

The receding tiles floor.

Are we done now? What about the binding, label and sleeve?

Finishing The Quilt

This actually deserves a post of its own. The binding and sleeve are simple enough; I stitch the sleeve into the binding on the top edge. But that hides my lovely arched door at the back and I am glad I did not spend time painting it.

More importatly,  I want to keep the story of my bayadere with the quilt and even more importantly, I wished to incorporate somewhere on this quilt, the heart-warming impromptu poem written by my friend, Suranga Date, when she saw the quilt being made.

Some old souls
still wander,
stunned at a changing world,
clutching at memories
as they watch
fabrics and clothes being abused;
not for their own exposure
but the wearers.

And then one day,
they watch
as a honeyed artist,
recreates them;
so much attention
to the odhani design,
folds and design stitched in;
the beauteous ghaagraa
living voluminous in black and gold,
the gold petticoat folds
peering at the base,
typically unsuccesful at covering the feet.

In her world,
it is not the done thing
to speak with words;
It is the eyes
that say them.

So few have receptors
in their brains for these visual words;
It takes a Madhu Mathur
to see and hear them…

She smiles.
This was exactly how it was.

The Frenchman tried,
but this one seems to succeed more.
Perhaps it has
something to do with Jaipur,
and its old Gayatri connections
to Baroda.

She smiles a bit more.
It has more to do with
everything coming
from the artist’s heart.

A big one at that!

Isnt it beautiful? I  consider various options and end up doing this!

I  design the label with the original bayadere image and its source printed on it.  I also write down the story of this quilt in a separate text box. The third text-box  contains Suranga’s poem. These are adjusted on a letter-sized page and printed on fabric.

I print the label, the legend and the poem on a printer -ready fabric sheet

The three boxes are lined with fabric individually to take care of raw edges. I start attaching the label as a pocket with the top edge left open. The plan is to insert the legend of the quilt and the poem inside the pocket. But with one edge of the pocket-label hand-stitched down,  I have another brain-wave. I stitch the bottom edge of the strip containing the poem inside the top edge of the label! No chances of the poem getting lost.

Am still undecided with what to do with the legend. And then comes the solution.

The legend is stitched to one side of the poem strip, which in turn is stitched just inside the label pocket.
The legend is folded over the poem…
The poem strip is neatly folded
And slipped inside the label pocket! Safe for as long as the quilt!
The Finished Quilt

So this how the quilt looks from the back.

The back of the quilt.

And here are images of the front.

The folds of the odhani and the ghaaghraa…

The folds of the odhani and ghaaghra
The details of the fabric manipulated for the ghaaghra…
Highlights in terracotta to add depth to the screen.
Just how big is the figure? About 6″ from the top of her head to the lehnga edge.

A

The quilt is 15″ across.

And her, finally, is the finished quilt!

The Baroda Bayadere – the completed quilt.

I hope I have been able to do justice to the Baroda Bayadere! She looks a bit older here than in the book, but that is understandable, she is older now! She also smiles a bit more in my quilt than she did in the wood engraving of the stranger.  That was unintentional. Perhaps she likes me better?

 

Pali Darwaza at Rajgad Fort—A Quilted Portrait!

Thread Sketch of Entrance Gate to ‘Rajgarh, Hill of the Kingdom’

Completed Quilt#2 in my 19th century wood engraving print series! 7” x10” The original print dated 1883, is 3.5”x5” and the image is from periodpaper.com.

The original wood engraving from periodpaper.com

The monument shown is, I believe, Pali Darwaza or the ‘first gate’, at Rajgad ” king of all forts “, near Pune, in Maharashtra, India. Rajgad, known as the unconquerable fort, has a history going back to at least the 15th century, but is best known because of its association with the great Shivaji, whose capital it was for over 26 years! Interestingly, this is a reverse image of the original monument, possibly because the original engraving on wood was correct, but when printed on paper, it got reversed. Look at this picture, from Wikipedia, taken from above, would you agree?

A Photograph of the Pali Darwaza from Wikicommons

Here is the reverse of my quilt, picture taken before I quilted the background.

I photoshopped the original picture to reduce the contrast and gave it an antique paper finish, before printing it on A4 size printer ready fabric sheet.

Tha sandwich was made with thin poly-batting and free-motion quilted with YLI Softouch ( black) and variegated Gutermann (sand) on Hasina, my Husqvarna Viking Topaz 20. I wanted to clarify that is not first thread painted and then quilted. Finished the edges with a simple zigzag ( which makes it eady to frame under glass, in case the recipient decides to) and a corner curled in to give it a dog-eared look! Here is a close-up!

Can you guess that you are going to see more of these thread sketches here?

‘The Tchatri at Tintoui’…Sketching With Thread and Some Detective Work

One thing that has always entranced me is the illustrations of buildings and places from the India of the nineteenth century. As the British travelled across this vast and fascinating land that they had recently colonised, they made a record of its diverse flora and fauna, its people and its rich architectural heritage. An artist usually travelled with the demographer/geographer/biologist/historian and the final document presented to the world was beautifully illustrated …such intricate drawings, with the minutest details!

Ever since I learnt to sketch with India ink on paper, I wanted to be able to draw like that! (One had those nib pens, that you dipped in bottles of ink and you controlled the width of the stroke by the angle of the nib and the pressure applied!) I never got around to it, but you can see some of my drawings from those days, about 40 years ago, here.

When I started quilting, I wondered if I could replicate those ink drawings with thread. I finally got around to trying it a few days back!

I would start with something not too complicated, I decided. This seemed a good candidate!

I reduced the contrast and brightened the image, till I had an outline of the basic shapes monuments and trees. I then changed the image size to 8″ x 10″ and printed it on printer- ready fabric. Added a 2.5″ wide mitred border in black and prepared the quilt sandwich with thin poly batting.

It was free motion quilted on Hasina, my Topaz 20 ( embroidery needle size 70) using YLI Softtouch thread.

Here are some pictures showing the progress of the quilting!

Thread sketching the chhatri
A close up of the tree
I love the back as much as the front!

I quilted the background with Invisafil smoke.

The background done in Invisafil smoke and the quilting is almost done, bar the finishing touches!

I wondered how it would look if I coloured it lightly, but was scared to ruin it. Then I had a brilliant idea! I flipped the quilt over, and tinted some areas of the back of the quilt with Inktense colour pencils! And added the border with some fancy stitches.

I think I like the back better than the front, but no one seems to agree!

When I flipped it over, I loved the back as much as I liked the front! Or perhaps more!

Now began my search for the monument that had been the inspiration for the wood engraving.

The legend read, ‘Tchatri at Tintoui in Bheel Country’ and I presumed that these would be the chhatris ( pavilions or canopies built over a place where a member of a royal family was cremated) near Udaipur in Rajasthan. The Bheels a proud, warrior tribe have long inhabited the forests near Udaipur. But I wondered about Tintoui.

A search on google maps took me to Tintoi in Gujarat, South of Udaipur, presumably also ‘Bheel Country’ – you can see how the hill forest to the West of Udaipur continued southward to the North of Tintoi.

Now to hunt for a chhatri near/ in Tintoi! Is it possible that Tintoi, now a small village, was earlier the name of a much larger surrounding area? Further research revealed that Sabarkantha District in which Tintoi Village was located also had ancient monuments in a forest area, called the Polo Forest! From there it was easy!

Not only was I on the right track, I also found my pair of chhatris, sadly much worse for wear over the last 140 odd years! But totally recognisable, including the tree with its slanting trunk! The website of Gujrat Tourism provided me the best picture of my chhatris! !But…the chhatris seem to be ‘flipped horizontal’ or a mirror image of the wood engraving! How was that possible? Then it struck me. The original engraving was true to the monument, but when it was printed on paper, a mirror image was created! Check the back of my quilt!

Isn’t that amazing!?

You can imagine how delighted I was. The Polo Forest is definitely on my bucket list of places to visit now!

I leave you with this image of my finished mini quilt. But I will be back soon with another thread sketch, for this is addictive, I tell you!

Nearly Insane—One More Block!

This 6″ block of the Salinda Rupp quilt was fairly simple, as you can see! I opened the seam at the edge as I plan to eventually assemble the blocks by machine.

Incidentally my new machine has arrived, haven’t had a chance to open it yet. It sounded like a great buy–has ten feet, including walking foot and free motion quilting feet and an extension table too! All just for $140 from Brother– I think it is Model 3340.

Block 81

Vital Stats

Number of pieces: 44

Difficulty level: Easy

Technique used: EPP

Block 81 Nearly Insane

So Houston, here I come!

Cupcakes and Tea with Jack – A Mini Quilt

The Jack’s Chain quilt block is one that has always fascinated me. I used it as Block Twelve, Dozens Squared, in my Dreamcatcher Round the Year BOM quilt too. But what intrigued me was the way the whole quilt comes together. I could not see myself making a full quilt but a mini appeared quite doable.

So here is my miniquilt, all of 10″ by 10″!

A cup of tea, anyone?

You have seen those 3/4″ ninepatches, of course, in my previous post.  I do not recommend this quilt in this size, unless you are seriously crazy about miniatures, which is why I did consider calling this quilt The Mad Hatter’s Tea Party.

Here are some pictures of the process.

First I machine sewed the nine-patches.  This method had given me two sets of nine-patches in reverse combinations, half with the pink in centre and halfwith the white in the centre. So, I  designed the quilt to make best use of the nine-patches. I also made six lime green and white nine-patches, to add some zing to the pink quilt.

I made 48 nine-patch blocks of 3/4″, half with 5 whites and half with 5 pinks.

Then I fussy cut 3/4″ triangles, with freezer paper at the back to make pieces for English paper piecing. 24 of them had a green flower in the centre and 18 of them had a white flower in the centre. Again, this was to make best use of my fabric where white flowers alternated with green on a pink background.  I needed 13 hexagons for my original design; these were also fussy cut, with freezer paper.

Now I was ready to put together the blocks. I am not sure I used the most efficient method, but it appeared to be the best when I embarked on it. I tried English paper piecing some of the blocks, but gave up and resorted to machine sewing, appliqueing and even hand sewing!

I began with the centre block.

I joined the surrounding pieces, before appliquéing a tea-cup hexagon in the centre.

Once this was done, I expanded on it by adding the surrounding hexagons with their teapots and more nine-patches…

The centre piece of the quilt.

I then made the six blocks that were planned for the edge and started to put everything together…

Added the six blocks around the centre
Realized the perfect match between my dress and the mini!

Ah! Finally done! But wait…

This was the original design, but it appeared incomplete!

It needed something more! Back to the drawing board …er…Quilt Assistant software on my laptop. More fussy cutting and six more hexagons.  This time the cupcakes. Well, what is a tea-party without cakes, in any case?

I appliqued the whole piece to a white background, and cut away a circle from the background centre. Next, I added two layers of thin polyester batting. cut away a circle from the inner layer so that only the white background had a double layer.

I did think of hand-quilting it, but it was too much of an effort. So stitch in the ditch it was! I started echo quilting it, but soon got bored of that so just finished off with some straight lines. My Husqvarna Viking does not need a change to a walking foot, so the entire quilting was done with the regular B foot!

 

This is seriously crazy piecing, I tell you!

A picture of the back. The binding was also fussy cut from a fat quarter and done in four pieces; I finished it to give a mitered look on the front.

The back

As usual, I had to do a mathematical check of the number of pieces! That is 548 pieces, excluding the binding and backing.

A close up of the tea party!

But all in all, I am quite happy with how this finally turned out. I am in the mood for another crazy mini. What do you suggest? I would like it to finish at the same size. Happy Quilting to you all, while I go and make myself a cup of…coffee. I am not a tea person.

The ‘Palat!’ Mini Quilts!

Eight mini quilts designed and quilted for a class reunion.

One of the eight `Palat!’ (Turn Around!) miniquilts…

A few months ago, eight classmates, who studied together in Grades 8 and 9, got connected after nearly fifty years – on an online chat group. Within a couple of weeks, they were talking of meeting in real life. The venue was to be my city and the occasion, my birthday! Naturally, I had to think of a very special gift for my seven girlfriends, three of whom would travel from 250kms, another three from a 1000kms and the seventh from right across the world!

It was not be just another bag, or cushion cover, or mugrug or whatever! It had to have a deeper significance, something that resonated with all of us.   I thought of our ties of friendship, which time could not weaken, for we, each of us, knew each other when we did not know who we would become, before we learnt to wear masks to fool the world…And now that we had found each other, we were not going to lose each other! Mini quilts these were to be!

I visualized eight girls holding hands, in a circle perhaps? Scrolling through Pinterest, I came across a hand-embroidered design of two sisters holding hands and pointing out to a rainbow and something clicked in my mind! The designer, Jessica, mentioned how she had modeled the hair of the two little girls after her own daughters.

The Design Process

I liked the fact that you saw the back of the two girls, and so I decided my girls would also have their backs to the viewer, representing our collective roots in the past. I would have the eight friends hold hands, to represent what we meant to each other, literally and figuratively. Gazing at distant horizons, we would be seeking our own rainbows, together and individually… I also wanted the quilt to be special for each girl. I thought then of one colour from the rainbow for each girl. The eighth colour could be aqua. The dresses of the girls would be appliqued in fabric in their respective colours. But I baulked at the thought of having to appliqué 64 dresses! Another design decision was taken. Each girl’s quilt would have just her dress appliquéd; the rest would be just ‘thread-sketched’.

It so happened that the eight girls names began with Sa, Ra ( two of them), Ga, Ma, Pa, Dha and Nee which are the names of the musical notes in Indian music! The girls, therefore, stood in that order. Why did I begin with the red and end at the violet, instead of vice versa? Because I could be either green or aqua, depending on which way I started, and I preferred the aqua to the green!

To echo the rainbow theme, the backing would be strip pieced in the eight colours. I even had the perfect fabric for it, a Bali Batik jelly roll gifted by my friend, Elvira Threeyama of Chez Viez Quilts. Each girl could sign on her own colour strip at the back, and we would each have quilts signed by all the others.

The next step was to scroll through all our class photographs to zero in on the hairstyles of the eight friends. I drafted the pattern of eight little girls, with hairstyles matching their hairstyles from high school, standing in a straight line. The girls were wearing shifts, like in the original pattern by Jessica of Cutesy Crafts. I was finally ready to ‘test’ my pattern.

The ‘Test’ Quilt

The first quilt was to be my quilt; all the experimentation was to be done on this! My pattern was to finish at  15″ x 21″ approximately. To make best use of my jelly roll strips, I cut them into three pieces, approximately 14″ long and added a 3.5″ black strip at the bottom and two 3.5″ black strips on either side to make up the width and length. Once I had my backing strip-pieced and ready, I got around to preparing the ‘top’.

I taped the pattern to a sunlit window and traced it to my light coloured fabric with a pigment ink marker with a micro tip. For the quilt sandwich, I used a polyfill batting. Using Pam Holland’s method, what she calls ‘ Quilting with Character and Charisma’ I machine quilted over my traced figures very slowly, adding in details as I went along. Once I reached ‘my’ figure, I did ‘raw-edge appliqué’ around the aqua dress (which I had glued on with a dab of school glue to ‘my figure’). This quilting took me about two hours, including the dress 👗 preparation.

The ‘Palat!’ miniquilt : I used a ‘Fabrico’ ink pen to colour the socks and hair ribbons red, like in our school dress.

To trace the rainbow, I marked a point at the centre bottom and rotated a 12″ ruler on the quilt, marking with a pencil as I went along. I used the needle-to-presser foot edge distance to space and quilt the various colours of the rainbow. I also did a bit of ‘outlining’ in the other dresses with thread!

My ‘Palat’ Miniquilt, with the rainbow in place.

The Learning

-The indigo and violet were too dark and the quilting did not show up at the back. I would need lighter shades for the rest of the quilts.

-I also forgot to reverse the colours in the backing and the ‘violet’ girl lined up on the red strip! The girls did not ‘stand’ in their respective colours, but nothing could be done about this, as the coloured strips were two inches wide.

-Black was not a good choice for the ‘additional’ strips. A lighter colour, preferably the same as the front, was needed.

The Aqua ‘Palat’ Miniquilt – the back left a lot to be desired!

For the life of me I could not see myself quilting seven more rainbows! Very tedious!

If I had to make seven more of these quilts, I would have to make it more interesting for myself! Perhaps they could all wear bell bottoms, which were such a rage in the late sixties, in one? Skirts in another? Lacy frocks in yet another? What about ‘lungis’ (sarongs) also very popular then?

So that is what I did!

‘ ‘Palat!’ : Sa’ in her red bell bottoms! See her hair? Where I began and ended the quilting!
The ‘Palat’ Miniquilt – RaY in her orange box-pleated skirt


The ‘Palat’ Miniquilt -Ru thinks I have short-changed her and given her the plainest dress! Don’t miss the strands of ‘hair’ below her ribbon!
A thin satin ribbon makes up the belt of Ga’s frock! I later added a tatting lace to the frock…
The ‘Palat’ Miniquilt : Actually, my quilt is the saddest looking! The embroidery on the dress is also pretty shabby!
The ‘Palat’ Miniquilt : I love Pa’s A-line dress! See that little lace I made, by cutting out holes at the edge?
Dha wears an indigo coat with a huge box pleat at the back, accessorized with boots and a crocheted muffler! I did rows of chain stitch around the neck to hold the muffler in place.
For Nee’s blouse I found a piece of fabric from a dress that had actually belonged to her some 50 years ago! This was a hexagon from scraps she had given to me for my hexagon quilt!

The Dedication and the Quilt Label

For the quilt labels, I downloaded free vector images of hot air balloons from the Internet and printed them on special computer printer fabric, which I had bought on my last visit to the USA. I then quilted these on to the front of the quilts.

The ‘gift tags’ on the quilts were hot air balloons, printed on fabric and then raw edge quilted to the front.

On the back, I fused the dedication cum label!

The back carried the names of the eight friends and the quilter’s name and date.

The Binding

I originally planned to bind the each of the quilts in its special theme colour. I began with the yellow, but then thought black would look nicer. Here are the bindings!

The binding…


The Reunion

Before I conclude this story and start posting more pictures, I have to share with you what we did at the reunion! Besides catching up on each other’s lives in late night sessions, talking non-stop, giggling continuously, screeching and screaming and having the time of our lives.

Of course, we signed our quilts for each other. We also went and bought tied and dyed ‘leheriya’ stoles, in the colours of the miniquilts; each wore a stole in ‘her’ colour! Don’t forget to check out the photos of the eight friends in their stoles!


Before I forget, why is this quilt called ‘Palat!’? Palat ! is a Hindi word meaning ‘Turn Around!’ Almost every one with whom I shared the quilt told me they wanted the girls to turn around and show them their faces!

So here come the pics! Beginning with the girls as they did ‘Palat!’

When the girls turned around…

Here are the pictures, front and back of each of the quilts.

The backs of the eight quilts…
…and the fronts of the eight minis.

And here are the close ups of the eight dresses!

Close ups of the dresses…
The two who wore bell bottoms.
…and three who wore shifts!

The eight quilts, laid out to receive their intended owners…

I laid out the miniquilts on the dining table and invited the girls over to help me lay the table…

…who were delighted to receive them!

To say they were surprised would be an understatement!

Well, so that was the story of my Palat! Miniquilts. Do stay tuned in to find out what I have been up to in the last few days!