Nearly Insane…Nearing the Finishing Line…Blocks 27 to 33

My sciatica pain is not yet gone, and that keeps me away from the sewing machine! So I continue my series of posts on the progress of my Nearly Insane Quilt,  based on a 19th century quilt by Salinda Rupp... I have now less than 20 blocks to finish! The blocks are all set on point, with 7 and 6 blocks in the alternating rows.

The blocks are 6″ square and except for a few, foundation paper pieced by me.  I drafted all the patterns for FPP on the free Quilt Assistant software, based on patterns in Liz Lois’s book, which contains only line drawings of the finished blocks.

Most of the fabric used is Summer Breeze 3  (with a fat quarter bundle of matching solids) by Moda Fabrics, and the Dutch Garden 2 Collection by Boundless Fabric. I also used a couple FQs in blues and greens plus a jelly roll of yellows I had in my stash.

These are the seven blocks from the fifth row :

Nearly Insane Block 27

Number of pieces: 16

Level of Difficulty: Difficult. A number of y-seams there plus the eight seams meeting n the centre! I also attempted some fussy cutting there! The block could probably have been prettier with more of a contrast; but I do like the soft colours too.

Technique: English paper pieced and hand-pieced

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 27
Nearly Insane Block  28

Number of pieces: 69

Level of Difficulty: Easy… despite the fair number of pieces. Again I did some fussy cutting for the corner pansies.

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP).

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 28
Nearly Insane Block 29

Number of pieces: 45

Level of Difficulty:  Easy. Took me longer to cut the striped triangles ‘just so’ than to piece the block.

Technique: Foundation Paper Piecing

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 29
Nearly Insane Block 30

Number of pieces: 34

Level of Difficulty: Easy.  What a delightfully whimsical block this is too.  I quite love it.

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 30
Nearly Insane Block 31

Number of pieces: 24

Level of Difficulty:  Easy. Not my favourite block and I just might end up re-doing this one. I do believe it needs more contrast to work.

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 31
Nearly Insane Quilt Block 32

Number of pieces: 58

Level of Difficulty: Moderate: Has a lot of points to match, so I would call it moderate. The plentiful half square and quater square triangles also meant there were several templates in the foundation paper piecing pattern. But it a pretty block, typically Ruppish, where she put together whatever she had at hand to make it add up to 6″!

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 32
Nearly Insane Quilt Block 33

Number of pieces: 28

Level of Difficulty: Easy but pretty. The larger pieces gave me the opportunity to use the larger prints from the Summer Breeze 3 collection.

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 33

 

In case you have missed my earlier updates, you can see

Row 1 ( Blocks 1-7) here   ; 

Row 2 (Blocks 8 to 13) on this post.

Row 3 (Blocks 14 to 20, with a couple missing) are to be found on this post

Row 4 (Blocks 21 to 26) can be seen here

 

 

 

 

Nearly Insane…Nearing the Finishing Line…Blocks 21 to 26

Here come the blocks from the fourth row of my Nearly Insane Quilt,  based on a 19th century quilt by Salinda Rupp... I have now less than 20 blocks to finish and I have started sharing the finished blocks in a series of posts, row by row! The blocks are all set on point, with 7 and 6 blocks in the alternating rows.

The blocks are 6″ square and except for a few, foundation paper pieced by me.  I drafted all the patterns for FPP on the free Quilt Assistant software, based on patterns in Liz Lois’s book, which contains only line drawings of the finished blocks.

Most of the fabric used is Summer Breeze 3  (with a fat quarter bundle of matching solids) by Moda Fabrics, and the Dutch Garden 2 Collection by Boundless Fabric. I also used a couple FQs in blues and greens plus a jelly roll of yellows I had in my stash.

These blocks are particularly pretty; I think Salinda was becoming more and more adventurous as she made newer blocks.

Nearly Insane Block 21

Number of pieces: 25

Level of Difficulty: Easy, but isn’t it pretty? I enjoyed fussy cutting those beautiful pansies.

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 21
Nearly Insane Block  22

Number of pieces: 133

Level of Difficulty: Difficult… it did have a lot of points to match…And one thing I would never recommend is making a pinwheel with paper piecing!Not only did I join a couple of them the wrong way, there is such a huge bulk in the centre that it is impossible to get a nice point there. FPP is also wasted on 4 patches! Easier piecedthe regular way.

(Did you notice I actually tried to fussy cut those flying geese?)

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP). I recommend regular machine piecing for everything but the flying geese !

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 22
Nearly Insane Block 23

Number of pieces: 45

Level of Difficulty:  Moderate, only because those narrow 1/4″ strips were so fiddly!

Technique: English Paper Piecing and hand-piecing, as I did not have a sewing machine when I did this one!

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 23
Nearly Insane Block 24

Number of pieces: 89

Level of Difficulty: Difficult for two reasons. Firstly, lots of points to match and secondly, one of the more difficult ones to draft as well as piece, as the flying geese are not all the same  1:2 ratio!

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 24
Nearly Insane Block 25

Number of pieces: 87

Level of Difficulty:  A very unusual block! The centre 3″ x 2″ portion contains such tiny pieces as compared to the huge outer pieces!

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 25
Nearly Insane Quilt Block 26

Number of pieces: 32

Level of Difficulty: Easy.

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 26

In case you have missed my earlier updates, you can see

Row 1 ( Blocks 1-7) here   ; 

Row 2 (Blocks 8 to 13) on this post.

Row 3 (Blocks 14 to 20, with a couple missing) are to be found on this post

 

 

 

 

Nearly Insane…Nearing the Finishing Line…Blocks 14 to 20

This is the third in my series of updates on my Nearly Insane Quilt, based on a 19th century quilt by Salinda Rupp... As I have now less than 20 blocks to finish, I have started sharing the finished blocks in a series of posts, row by row! The blocks are all set on point, with 7 and 6 blocks in the alternating rows.

You can see Blocks 1-7 here    and Blocks 8 to 13 on this post.

The blocks are 6″ square and except for a few, foundation paper pieced by me.  I drafted all the patterns for FPP on the free Quilt Assistant software, based on patterns in Liz Lois’s book, which contains only line drawings of the finished blocks.

Most of the fabric used is Summer Breeze 3  (with a fat quarter bundle of matching solids) by Moda Fabrics, and the Dutch Garden 2 Collection by Boundless Fabric. I also used a couple FQs in blues and greens plus a jelly roll of yellows I had in my stash.

There are two blocks yet to be done in this row, so I have only five blocks here instead  of seven.

Nearly Insane Block 14

Number of pieces: 25

Level of Difficulty: Easy

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 14
Nearly Insane Block 15

Number of pieces: 35

Level of Difficulty: Easy, but did have a lot of points to match…

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 15
Nearly Insane Block 17

Number of pieces: 121

Level of Difficulty: Difficult.

I found this the most difficult block in the 80 odd that I have pieced so far in this quilt. Not only were there dozens of points to match, it also had rectangles, which are not very easy to foundation paper piece. When I was cutting the fabric, I didn’t realize these were rectangles, so all my fabric was cut wrong! I had also drafted it as a series of ‘square in square’ templates, and matching the points was quite a task. The least bit of discrepancy appears quite glaring when the pieces are so small. So I resorted to hand-piecing at assembly time.

Technique: Foundation Paper Piecing and hand-pieced. I would suggest hand-piecing or English paper-piecing for this one!

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 17
Nearly Insane Block 19

Number of pieces: 44

Level of Difficulty: Easy, but lots of points to match again. This block was one of the more difficult ones to draft, as the pieces are set on point!

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 19
Nearly Insane Block 20

Number of pieces: 40

Level of Difficulty: Easy. A very unusual, but very pretty block.

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 20

 

 That leaves Block 16, which is almost totally improvised, made with all the scraps Salina was left over with, I am sure. So I have also kept it for the last. Block 18, on the other hand, has 229 (yes, two hundred and twenty nine!) pieces and is next on my list. Cutting the pieces took me over four hours! So, let’s see when I can get around to it. Meanwhile, here is happy quilting to all you quilters out there!

 

 

 

 

Nearly Insane…Nearing the Finishing Line…Blocks 8 to 13

Continuing the update on my Nearly Insane Quilt, based on a 19th century quilt by Salinda Rupp... As I have now less than 20 blocks to finish, I have started sharing the finished blocks in a series of posts, row by row! The blocks are all set on point, with 7 and 6 blocks in the alternating rows.

You can see Blocks 1-7 here.

The blocks are 6″ square and except for a few, foundation paper pieced by me.  I drafted all the patterns for FPP on the free Quilt Assistant software, based on patterns in Liz Lois’s book, which contains only line drawings of the finished blocks.

Most of the fabric used is Summer Breeze 3  (with a fat quarter bundle of matching solids) by Moda Fabrics, and the Dutch Garden 2 Collection by Boundless Fabric. I also used a couple FQs in blues and greens plus a jelly roll of yellows I had in my stash.

So here comes Row Two, with six blocks!

Nearly Insane Block 8

Number of pieces: 148

Level of Difficulty: One of the more difficult blocks, with lots of pieces and lots of points to match! But this block also symbolizes what I love about this quilt. Salinda did not worry about the directions of the HSTs; it is the whimsy that makes this quilt so charming.

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 8
Nearly Insane Block 9

Number of pieces: 76

Level of Difficulty: Moderate, mainly because of the number of pieces.

Technique: Hand-pieced (because I did not have a sewing machine at hand when I did this one.

Nearly Insane Block 9
Nearly Insane Block 10

Number of pieces:  25

Level of Difficulty: Very Easy! I think Salinda needed to do a few really easy blocks after 8 and 9!

Technique: Foundation Paper Piecing

(The fabric here, other than the green, is from the Dutch Garden Collection.)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 10
Nearly Insane Block 11

Number of pieces: 24

Level of Difficulty: Easy log cabin block with a little bit of fussy cutting for the centre 4-patch. But how very pretty it is. There are two more similar log cabin blocks in the quilt; #46 has a star in the centre and #76 has a square.

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 11
Nearly Insane Block 12

Number of pieces:

Level of Difficulty: Easy. Another whimsical block where Salinda just just pieced whatever small bits of fabric she had at hand. I love it!

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 12
Nearly Insane Block 13

Number of pieces: 9

Level of Difficulty: Easy. This has to be the simplest block in the quilt, identical to Block 78 except for the width of the strips, I think.

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 13

So that takes care of Row 2.  Check back to see how Row 3 is progressing!

 

 

 

 

 

Nearly Insane…Nearing the Finishing Line…Blocks 1 to 7

An update on my Nearly Insane Quilt, based on a 19th century quilt by Salinda Rupp, has been long overdue. As I have now less than 20 blocks to finish, I’ll start sharing the finished blocks in a series of posts, row by row! The blocks are all set on point, with 7 and 6 blocks in the alternating rows.

The blocks are 6″ square and except for a few, foundation paper pieced by me.  I drafted all the patterns for FPP on the free Quilt Assistant software, based on patterns in Liz Lois’s book, which contains only line drawings of the finished blocks.

Most of the fabric used is Summer Breeze 3  (with a fat quarter bundle of matching solids) by Moda Fabrics, and the Dutch Garden 2 Collection by Boundless Fabric. I also used a couple FQs in blues and greens plus a jelly roll of yellows I had in my stash.

So here comes Row One, with seven blocks!

Nearly Insane Block 1

Number of pieces: 35

Level of Difficulty: Easy

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 1
Nearly Insane Block 2

Number of pieces: 21

Level of Difficulty: Easy

Technique: English paper pieced (because I did not have a sewing machine at hand when I did this one.

Salinda Rupp Quilt Nearly Insane by patchworkofmylife Block 2
Nearly Insane Quilt Block 2
Nearly Insane Block 3

Number of pieces:  37

Level of Difficulty: Easy

Technique: Foundation Paper Piecing

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 3
Nearly Insane Block 4

Number of pieces: 33

Level of Difficulty: Easy

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 4
Nearly Insane Block 5

Number of pieces: 40

Level of Difficulty: Easy

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

(The blue fabric here is from the Dutch Garden Collection.)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 5
Nearly Insane Block 6

Number of pieces: 21

Level of Difficulty: Easy

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 6
Nearly Insane Block 7

Number of pieces: 36

Level of Difficulty: Easy (though did have a number of poiunts to match!)

Technique: Foundation paper pieced (FPP)

Nearly Insane Quilt Block 7

Aren’t they pretty? I am so totally in love with this quilt.

 

 

 

 

 

The Broken Wing: The Crane Quilt

A miniature silk quilt completed in 2018, for Andy Brunhammer & Jim Smith’s Hope Project.*

Patchworkofmylife crane mini quilt
Pieced origami quilt block

The beautiful cream colored silks were a gift from Tina Katwal of The Square Inch, Chennai!

Patchworkofmylife crane mini quilt
10 cranes were pieced in pure fine silk on a textured raw silk background; the smallest 1” and largest 3” big
Patchworkofmylife crane mini quilt
The hand quilted rows are 1/8” to 1/10” apart.
The cranes are lightly trapuntoed and outlined in silver thread.
Patchworkofmylife crane mini quilt
Weeds made with unraveled silver thread embroidered in to add interest to the background.
Patchworkofmylife crane mini quilt
The smallest, leading crane has a broken wing…giving the quilt its title.
Patchworkofmylife crane mini quilt
The finished cranes mini quilt ‘The Broken Wing’

Ready to hang…

*The Story of the Hope Project:

I quote Jim:

A couple of years ago a Facebook connection was making Cranes quilt blocks, and I learned that he was making 1,000 Crane Blocks. I asked him about his idea and why did he feel inclined to make the 1,000 Cranes. 
I had read about the young  Japanese Hiroshima victim, Sadako Sasaki  and her challenge to herself about attempting to fold 1,000 Origami Cranes. The tale spins in different directions whether she survived her goal before she passed away from complications attributed to the nuclear explosion and sickness

I then asked Andy if he was willing to, between quilt projects, to possibly create Crane paper-pieced blocks from leftover scraps. I told him that I had an idea of designing and creating, once we reached 1,000 Cranes, a possible series of Cranes Quilt panels that we could donate to a children’s hospital. 

Andy agreed. I created a pattern. At the time we were asked by a friend of ours, Melissa Helms, to design a quilt for the 25th Anniversary for a children’s cancer society...

And so the Hope Project was born, which I joined in.

The Hope Project was premiered at the UUC Octagon Art Center in Clearwater, Florida in January this year. Five of the 40 odd quilts made by Jim and Andy were also recently shown at Houston 2019. They eventually hope to donate their collection to a Pediatric Cancer facility/ organization/ hospital…

Who’s The Prettiest of Them All?

I bought this panel of the Frozen princesses To make a quilt ( or wall hanging) for my grand-niece who is a great fan of the two!

The Frozen Princesses Anna and Elsa are my grand-niece K’s favourites!

She was due to visit us and I thought of a quick gift for her. But how boring would this be!

So I came up with this idea.

K goes to the centre of the panel, while the other two look at her admiringly.

I printed her face on a printer-ready fabric sheet after calculating the size I would need to make it.

Everything got more complicated than necessary because I planned to put K on the right side. I cut out the pink princess ( is that Elsa or Anna?) before I realised that that would make my darling Princess K an ‘outsider’ because the other two had interlocked arms.

So I disengaged their arms and locked them with Princess K’s who moved to the centre. Ah, that’s the way I like it. The Disney Princesses look at her admiringly ( and a bit enviously?). The Resident Consultant did not think much of my original idea of a silver dress for his Princess. So I retained the silver yoke and made her blue dress from…a rayon grocery bag! ( Jaipur is a big exporter of women’s clothing. With single use plastic being banned in India, our shopkeepers are using bags made from export-surplus fabric and export-reject dresses).

The quilting was kept to a minimum. ( Also because I had just over a couple of hours for the quilting and finishing). I folded the lighter pink border to the back of the quilted piece, leaving the darker plum inner border to frame the quilt. No binding. The top border became the sleeve.

Not that my Princess minded the short-cuts taken to finish her portrait! She couldn’t believe what she saw.

“How? wow! how? wow…”, she exclaimed!

And here is the Princess herself, posing with her quilted wall-hanging.

Princess K loves her quilt!

Now that done, I have to decide what comes up next!